Electric Cars

With the continued fluctuations in the price of fuel, Americans are turning to more efficient vehicles. Backed by thousands of dollars in government subsidies, many automakers are producing and selling alternative fuel, hybrid, and all-electric vehicles to cope with the price at the pump. In the 2013 model year, innovation is taking a front-seat perspective as automakers continue to improve on past designs and create new ones that outperform the old.

2013 Toyota RAV4 EV

2013 Toyota RAV4 EV

Based off the Toyota RAV4 SUV, this all-electric machine packs an-154 horsepower electric motor capable of accelerating from 0-60 in 7 seconds. Combined with its revolutionary aerodynamic design, the RAV4 EV has a range of approximately 100 miles, and, with its charging time of less than 6 hours on 240V power, the RAV4 can be back on the road in no time. The RAV4 is identical to its gas-powered cousin in interior space and comfort, but it never needs to make a trip to the fuel station.

2013 Ford C-Max Energi Plug-In Hybrid

2013 Ford C-Max Energi Plug-In Hybrid

Although the Ford C-Max is not an all-electric vehicle, it deserves mention in the same vein. With it plug-in feature, the C-Max can function just like an electric car, and when the battery power runs low, the C-Max can be switched to gas. In reality, the driver controls whether the C-Max is a gasoline-powered car, a hybrid, or an all-electric car. On top of all its features, the C-Max has the ability to recharge in 7 hours on traditional 120 Volt power.

2013 Honda Fit EV

2013 Honda Fit EV

For years the Honda Fit has been in the same realm as the Toyota Prius and other ecologically sensitive models. With the advent of the 2013 Fit EV, this vehicle takes the plunge into the electric car world. The Fit EV is identical to the gas-powered Fit; however, this new vehicle is completely emission-free. With a charging time of less than 15 hours and a range of 82 miles, the Fit EV is right in the market with the Nissan Leaf and the Mitsubishi Miev. In actuality, the Fit EV has over 70 more foot-pounds of torque than its gas-powered Honda Fit cousin.

Competition with Gas-Powered Vehicles

To truly compete with gas-powered vehicles, electric cars must have significant range, low charging times, a reasonable price, and adequate comfort. These features are a part of all the three models mentioned above. All three have a range over 80 miles, and all three pack a host of options, features, and accessories to make them as comfortable as any hybrid or gas powered car.

The most important consideration when looking at the growing field of electric cars is price. Although an electric vehicle does not use gasoline, thus eliminating fuel costs, the dealership MSRP and the cost of charging the vehicle daily can play a key role in customer decisions. The Ford C-Max Energi starts at $32,950 while neither the Toyota RAV4 EV or Honda Fit EV have a stated MSRP as of yet.

Electric vehicles are the only tried-and-true alternative to gas-powered cars. Unlike natural gas vehicles, hybrids, and flex-fuel machines, electric vehicles have a history as long as the internal combustion engine powered car. With continued improvements in technology and performance, these efficient rides will not be disappearing any time soon.